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Nils Frederik Tolksdorf

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 Nils Frederik Tolksdorf

Fakultät für Kulturwissenschaften > Institut für Germanistik und Vergleichende Literaturwissenschaft > Germanistische und Allgemeine Sprachwissenschaft

Wissenschaftlicher Mitarbeiter

Institut für Germanistik und Vergleichende Literaturwissenschaft

Wissenschaftlicher Mitarbeiter

Telefon:
+49 5251 60-5705
Büro:
TP21.2.05
Sprechzeiten:

nach Vereinbarung

Besucher:
Technologiepark 21
33100 Paderborn
Forschungsprojekte

Seit 2018: Frühkindlicher Medienumgang und Sprachlernen mit Sozialen Robotern (merits)

Projektziel ist die Erkundung, wie und ob der Umgang mit sozialen Robotern bildungsrelevante Erfahrungen mit zentralen Elementen digitaler Technologien ermöglicht (digitale Medienbildung) und sich durch systematische Interaktionsanlässe dazu eignet, umfassende Sprachbildung im Elementarbereich anzubieten.

 

Projektleitung:

Prof. Dr. Katharina J. Rohlfing, Prof. Dr. Isabel Zorn

Projektförderung:

Das Projekt wird im Rahmen der Förderlinie „Digitale Gesellschaft“ von der Landesregierung Nordrhein-Westfalen gefördert.

Forschungsschwerpunkte

Research Interests:

  • Early language development, children's acquisition of words
  • Cross-situational word learning
  • Language learning with social robots
  • Social robotics
  • Robots in early education

Nils F. Tolksdorf is a PhD fellow of the Digital Society research program, funded by the State of North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany, and works at Paderborn University, under the supervision of Prof. Dr. Katharina Rohlfing. He received his B.A. and M.A. degrees in Linguistics from Paderborn University. His research focuses on how children can consolidate language learning in a long-term and robust way with a social robot.


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2021

Do Shy Preschoolers Interact Differently When Learning Language With a Social Robot? An Analysis of Interactional Behavior and Word Learning

N.F. Tolksdorf, F.E. Viertel, K.J. Rohlfing, Frontiers in Robotics and AI (2021)

<jats:p>Temperamental traits can decisively influence how children enter into social interaction with their environment. Yet, in the field of child–robot interaction, little is known about how individual differences such as shyness impact on how children interact with social robots in educational settings. The present study systematically assessed the temperament of 28 preschool children aged 4–5 years in order to investigate the role of shyness within a dyadic child–robot interaction. Over the course of four consecutive sessions, we observed how shy compared to nonshy children interacted with a social robot during a word-learning educational setting and how shyness influenced children’s learning outcomes. Overall, results suggested that shy children not only interacted differently with a robot compared to nonshy children, but also changed their behavior over the course of the sessions. Critically, shy children interacted less expressively with the robot in general. With regard to children’s language learning outcomes, shy children scored lower on an initial posttest, but were able to close this gap on a later test, resulting in all children retrieving the learned words on a similar level. When intertest learning gain was considered, regression analyses even confirmed a positive predictive role of shyness on language learning gains. Findings are discussed with regard to the role of shyness in educational settings with social robots and the implications for future interaction design.</jats:p>


    Comparing the Effects of a Different Social Partner (Social Robot vs. Human) on Children's Social Referencing in Interaction

    N.F. Tolksdorf, C.E. Crawshaw, K.J. Rohlfing, Frontiers in Education (2021)

    <jats:p>Social robots have emerged as a new digital technology that is increasingly being implemented in the educational landscape. While social robots could be deployed to assist young children with their learning in a variety of different ways, the typical approach in educational practices is to supplement the learning process rather than to replace the human caregiver, e.g., the teacher, parent, educator or therapist. When functioning in the role of an educational assistant, social robots will likely constitute a part of a triadic interaction with the child and the human caregiver. Surprisingly, there is little research that systematically investigates the role of the caregiver by examining the ways in which children involve or check in with them during their interaction with another partner<jats:bold>—</jats:bold>a phenomenon that is known as social referencing. In the present study, we investigated social referencing in the context of a dyadic child–robot interaction. Over the course of four sessions within our longitudinal language-learning study, we observed how 20 pre-school children aged 4–5 years checked in with their accompanying caregivers who were not actively involved in the language-learning procedure. The children participating in the study were randomly assigned to either an interaction with a social robot or a human partner. Our results revealed that all children across both conditions utilized social referencing behaviors to address their caregiver. However, we found that the children who interacted with the social robot did so significantly more frequently in each of the four sessions than those who interacted with the human partner. Further analyses showed that no significant change in their behavior over the course of the sessions could be observed. Findings are discussed with regard to the caregiver's role during children's interactions with social robots and the implications for future interaction design.</jats:p>


      Do Shy Children Keep more Distance from a Social Robot? Exploring Shy Children’s Proxemics with a Social Robot or a Human

      N.F. Tolksdorf, F.E. Viertel, C.E. Crawshaw, K.J. Rohlfing, in: Interaction Design and Children, 2021


      Ethical Considerations of Applying Robots in Kindergarten Settings: Towards an Approach from a Macroperspective

      N.F. Tolksdorf, S. Siebert, I. Zorn, I. Horwath, K.J. Rohlfing, International Journal of Social Robotics (2021), pp. 129-140

      <jats:title>Abstract</jats:title><jats:p>In child–robot interaction (cHRI) research, many studies pursue the goal to develop interactive systems that can be applied in everyday settings. For early education, increasingly, the setting of a kindergarten is targeted. However, when cHRI and research are brought into a kindergarten, a range of ethical and related procedural aspects have to be considered and dealt with. While ethical models elaborated within other human–robot interaction settings, e.g., assisted living contexts, can provide some important indicators for relevant issues, we argue that it is important to start developing a systematic approach to identify and tackle those ethical issues which rise with cHRI in kindergarten settings on a more global level and address the impact of the technology from a macroperspective beyond the effects on the individual. Based on our experience in conducting studies with children in general and pedagogical considerations on the role of the institution of kindergarten in specific, in this paper, we enfold some relevant aspects that have barely been addressed in an explicit way in current cHRI research. Four areas are analyzed and key ethical issues are identified in each area: (1) the institutional setting of a kindergarten, (2) children as a vulnerable group, (3) the caregivers’ role, and (4) pedagogical concepts. With our considerations, we aim at (i) broadening the methodology of the current studies within the area of cHRI, (ii) revalidate it based on our comprehensive empirical experience with research in kindergarten settings, both laboratory and real-world contexts, and (iii) provide a framework for the development of a more systematic approach to address the ethical issues in cHRI research within kindergarten settings.</jats:p>


        2020

        Beyond words: Children’s multimodal responses during word learning with a social robot

        N.F. Tolksdorf, U.J. Mertens, in: International Perspectives on Digital Media and Early Literacy, Routledge, 2020, pp. 90-102

        Digital devices such as social robots are increasingly being developed as artificially intelligent learning tools that could support and expand early childhood education by providing new ways to engage children in social interaction. Given this potential, research in child-robot interaction has begun to investigate which aspects of a robot’s behavior provide advantages within the interaction. However, a perspective that addresses the child’s communicative behavior within a child-robot interaction is seldom explored. In this chapter, the results of a long-term child-robot study with preschool children are presented, in which children’s multimodal response behavior during a word learning task with a social robot was in focus. The results reveal that children not only used different communicative multimodal signals such as gestures or delay markers when interacting with the robot, but also changed their behavior over the course of the sessions. The findings suggest that children shape their responses to a robot in a manifold multimodal way beyond verbal lexical utterances. Finally, implications for future child-robot interaction research, as well as identifying issues that will need to be resolved for social robots to be helpful and responsive in interaction with young learners, are discussed.


          Do Shy Children Behave Differently than Non-shy Children in a Long-term Child-robot Interaction?

          N.F. Tolksdorf, F. Viertel, K.J. Rohlfing, in: Companion of the 2020 ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction, 2020


          Parents’ Views on Using Social Robots for Language Learning

          N.F. Tolksdorf, K.J. Rohlfing, in: 2020 29th IEEE International Conference on Robot and Human Interactive Communication (RO-MAN), 2020


          2019

          New opportunities for early education in the digital age? Examining the role of social robots

          N.F. Tolksdorf. New opportunities for early education in the digital age? Examining the role of social robots. 2019.


          Do shy children behave differently than non-shy children in a child-robot interaction? An analysis of positive and negative expressions of shyness in kindergarten children

          N.F. Tolksdorf, H. Dirk, K.J. Rohlfing, F.E. Viertel. Do shy children behave differently than non-shy children in a child-robot interaction? An analysis of positive and negative expressions of shyness in kindergarten children. 2019.


          Reconceptualising early childhood literacy facing child-robot interaction

          N.F. Tolksdorf, K.J. Rohlfing. Reconceptualising early childhood literacy facing child-robot interaction. 2019.


          Raising Robotic Natives?: Persuasive Potentials of Social Robots in Early Education

          S. Siebert, N.F. Tolksdorf, K.J. Rohlfing, I. Zorn, The Journal of Communication and Media Studies (2019), pp. 21-35


          When learning words with robots, children’s answers are multimodal: a challenge for a dialogue design

          N.F. Tolksdorf, U.J. Mertens, K.J. Rohlfing. When learning words with robots, children’s answers are multimodal: a challenge for a dialogue design. 2019.


          Social robots–new opportunities for early language learning in the digital age? Ethical considerations and moving towards goal-oriented co-action

          N.F. Tolksdorf. Social robots–new opportunities for early language learning in the digital age? Ethical considerations and moving towards goal-oriented co-action. 2019.


          2018

          Can the reduction of an iconic gesture aid long-term learning? A pilot child-robot-study

          U.J. Mertens, K. Bergmann, N.F. Tolksdorf, K.J. Rohlfing. Can the reduction of an iconic gesture aid long-term learning? A pilot child-robot-study. 2018.


          Raising Robotic Natives? Ethical aspects of learning with robots in kindergarten

          N.F. Tolksdorf, S. Siebert. Raising Robotic Natives? Ethical aspects of learning with robots in kindergarten. 2018.


          Multimodal response behavior of children during word learning with a robot

          N.F. Tolksdorf, U.J. Mertens, K.J. Rohlfing. Multimodal response behavior of children during word learning with a robot. 2018.


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