Achtung:

Sie haben Javascript deaktiviert!
Sie haben versucht eine Funktion zu nutzen, die nur mit Javascript möglich ist. Um sämtliche Funktionalitäten unserer Internetseite zu nutzen, aktivieren Sie bitte Javascript in Ihrem Browser.

Forschungs- und Themenschwerpunkte der AG Bildungsmanagement Show image information
Technologiepark 21 - Sitz der Arbeitsgruppe Show image information
Smart Automation Laboratory des Lehrstuhls für Produktentstehung zur 
Untersuchung von Arbeit 4.0 Show image information
SimMan - Versuchsaufbau im Rahmen des Projektes "Intuition als Komponente beruflicher Kompetenz" Show image information

Forschungs- und Themenschwerpunkte der AG Bildungsmanagement

Photo: Michael Goller

Technologiepark 21 - Sitz der Arbeitsgruppe

Photo: Michael Goller

Smart Automation Laboratory des Lehrstuhls für Produktentstehung zur Untersuchung von Arbeit 4.0

Photo: Lehrstuhl für Produktentstehung, Alexander Pöhler

SimMan - Versuchsaufbau im Rahmen des Projektes "Intuition als Komponente beruflicher Kompetenz"

Photo: Christian Harteis

|

Gastvorlesung von Herrn Harteis an der Griffith University in Brisbane

Herr Prof. Dr. Christian Harteis hält am 24.02.2017 eine Gastvorlesung an der Griffith University in Brisbane, Australien zu folgendem Thema:

Title: "Chunking in Chess: Expertise Differences in Eye Movements and Recall Performance"

Chess players were often used to examine cognitive processes of pattern recognition and recalling chess patterns within psychological studies of expertise. Experts are superior in recalling chess patterns, as long as they are confronted with real game positions. This is due to their experience of chess that enables them to build larger chunks. However, most of the chess expertise studies have not investigated the process of acquiring the chess position information.

The presented ongoing study aims at examining whether expertise and chunking processes are identifiable via eye-tracking. The participants (N = 40) represented four levels of chess skills:

i) laypersons,
ii) novice players,
iii) intermediate and
iv) expert players.

The experiment consisted of eight trials. Four of the trials were real middle game positions, four were random positions. The stimuli were shown for 5 seconds each. The participants then completed the recall task using a chess software without time limit. Eye-movements and recall performance were recorded.

The presentation reports preliminary results of this investigation.

The University for the Information Society