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Forschungs- und Themenschwerpunkte der AG Bildungsmanagement Bildinformationen anzeigen
Technologiepark 21 - Sitz der Arbeitsgruppe Bildinformationen anzeigen
Smart Automation Laboratory des Lehrstuhls für Produktentstehung zur 
Untersuchung von Arbeit 4.0 Bildinformationen anzeigen
SimMan - Versuchsaufbau im Rahmen des Projektes "Intuition als Komponente beruflicher Kompetenz" Bildinformationen anzeigen

Forschungs- und Themenschwerpunkte der AG Bildungsmanagement

Foto: Michael Goller

Technologiepark 21 - Sitz der Arbeitsgruppe

Foto: Michael Goller

Smart Automation Laboratory des Lehrstuhls für Produktentstehung zur Untersuchung von Arbeit 4.0

Foto: Lehrstuhl für Produktentstehung, Alexander Pöhler

SimMan - Versuchsaufbau im Rahmen des Projektes "Intuition als Komponente beruflicher Kompetenz"

Foto: Christian Harteis

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Neuerscheinung: „Engineering students' learning during internships: Exploring the explanatory power of the job demands‐control‐support model“ (Goller, Harteis, Gijbels, & Donche, 2020)

Goller, M., Harteis, C., Gijbels, D., & Donche, V. (2020). Engineering students' learning during internships: Exploring the explanatory power of the job demands-control-support model. Journal of Engineering Education, 109(2), Online First. https://doi.org/10.1002/jee.20308

Abstract:

Background
Internships are highly relevant learning experiences for engineering students. However, such practice‐based learning settings must be carefully designed to allow their learning potential to unfold.

Purpose
Exploring the job demands‐control‐support (JDCS) model, this study aimed to investigate how job demands, job control, and social support affect interns' use of different learning strategies.

Method
The study utilized data collected from a sample of engineering students (n = 118) who completed a required internship during their degree. The data were analyzed using a structural equation modeling approach including latent factors.

Results
Job demands were found to be a relevant and significant driver of students' shared regulation (e.g., asking for feedback), self‐regulation (e.g., self‐directed use of codified information), efforts to relate theory to practice (e.g., connecting workplace experience with theoretical knowledge), and the absence of avoidance of learning (e.g., lack of adaptation to work situations), but not of external regulation (e.g., asking for help to solve problems). Job control, however, was not found to be a positive or significant driver of student learning. Social support was found to be a relevant and significant predictor of external and shared regulation but not of the other learning activities.

Conclusions
This study provided mixed findings regarding key hypotheses central to the JDCS model, generating rather poor evidence supporting it. In fact, job demands, job control, and social support exhibited much less explanatory power than expected for engineering students' learning during internships.

Der Beitrag wurde Open Access publiziert und kann unter https://doi.org/10.1002/jee.20308 kostenfrei gelesen und heruntergeladen werden.

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